Friday, October 19, 2007

spoonerism

i took this photo off the net, but i once saw an identical x-ray.

it was in kalafong. the guy had the usual story of some amazingly ridiculous way he got the spoon into his rectum. it was something to do with painting his house and falling off the ladder and landing on the spoon. i did not ask why he was painting naked and i did not ask how the spoon happened to be standing on end (the narrow end) ready for the falling receptive anus. i just smiled and waved (apologies madagaskar) .

not too much to the story. i put in a proctoscope and grasped the spoon with a burkit. this i did in casualties. i only hope the patient cleaned the spoon well afterwards (depending on what he planned on doing with it of course).

when the case was presented to the prof, with a straight face he says, 'wat het jy vir hom gese? moenie roer nie, ek is nou daar.'

p.s, trust me, if you know afrikaans, this was seriously funny. to my international viewers, no translation can do it justice.

13 comments:

Greg P said...

Well, some of us still can't resist going to http://interpret.co.za/html/transtext.php
to try on our own. There I get the obvious perfect translation:
"what has you for him gese? don't curl not , i am now/narrow there."
Makes perfect sense.

Bongi said...

ha ha ha. that is quite an interesting translation.

ok, the basic meaning would be, don't move. i'll be with you in a moment. but the exact translation is, don't stir (get it??? spoon, stir???) i'm there now.


somehow a joke is lost when one has to do a dr evil impersonation and explain it.

oh well.

Bongi said...

vir my suid afrikaanse lesers, toe ek die pasient gesien het wou ek eintlik vir hom gevra het; "het iemand vir jou gese om jou gat te roer?"

Greg P said...

I was surprised that the translator had nothing for "gese", especially since you used it again. Obviously a verb, perhaps a bit colloquial?

rlbates said...

Actually, bongi, for me "Don't stir. I'll be there in a moment." works for me. I get it. Very funny (and even better when a formal prof says it with a straight face).

Jason said...

LOL @ joke.

Your patient has a real interesting story. Makes for much imagination there. :)

Btw, the surgeon(?) in the picture struck me as odd until I realised it was a not-so-good Photoshopped entry for a competition.

Bongi said...

greg, the word for say is se but the e has a little hat on. i don't know how to type that. so actually i made a typo and that is probably why it couldn't be translated.

Greg P said...

OK...try this:

We're talking about e-circumflex, right?
Use the HTML codes, which start with '&' and end with ';', there are mnemonics for many -- e-circumflex is 'ecirc', so type in 'ê' in your editing window, and Blogger will transform for you.

Here is a site:
http://www.htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/entities/latin1.html
that lists these for your reference.

Greg P said...

As you can see, it even worked with my comment...

Bongi said...

this is a test ê

Bongi said...

thanks greg. it worked. the word in question would be gesê

Sid Schwab said...

In the case of a maraschino cherry jar, in the same location (one can only wonder why there wasn't also a spoon), the surgeons not only didn't ask the obvious question you so discreetly avoided, they published the patient's explanation in a scholarly article.

Sid Schwab said...

Did ask. They DID ask...